Zero Waste Europe in 2016 – Our Year in Review

Zero Waste Europe in 2016 – Our Year in Review
Zero Waste Europe in 2016 – Our Year in Review 2017-06-14T17:12:43+00:00
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Preface

Over 2016 the impact of Zero Waste Europe has continued to grow. We have seen new members from around Europe join our association, new staff enrich our secretariat and new areas of work have brought the zero waste work to a larger audience than ever.

Throughout 2016 we were at the cutting edge of the zero waste movement, building on our work of previous years and building new campaigns. Our network of towns has continued to grow reaching almost 400 towns. After a successful conference and annual meeting in Ljubljana, Slovenia, we welcomed 3 new members to the network, expanding our reach into new regions of Europe.

Together with dozens of global organisations we have launched an ambitious campaign on plastics and we are spearheading the European branch of this new global movement.to Break Free From Plastics. The ‘Break Free From Plastic’ coalition aims to fundamentally change our relationship with plastic and hopes to address the root causes of plastic pollution and waste. As the European coordinators for an alignment process we were responsible for bringing together organisations working on waste from across Europe. This process has continued to grow and will be taking on more form and activities throughout 2017.

On a European level, the Circular Economy Package has continued to act as a focus. With Zero Waste Europe producing position papers on issues such as food waste in the Circular Economy and consistently calling on the European Parliament to demand high targets in the package. Beyond the Circular Economy, we have also engaged with the European Commission’s Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive proposals, calling for 4 major instruments to be used including modulated EPR fees, and a stronger effort on prevention.

From an organisational perspective we have continued to grow the team during 2016, hiring Delphine Levi Alvares, working on the products policy and leading the coordination of the alignment process for the European aspect of ‘Break Free From Plastic’.

All in all we have managed to consolidate our organisation as the main reference for European-wide NGOs working and waste and resources.

Joan Marc Simon – Director of Zero Waste Europe

Work Areas

Resources

Income & Funds Raised

63.4%

€340,631
EU Grants

30.3%

€162,056
Foundation Grants

5.9%

€31,763
Donations & Membership Fees

100%

€534,450
Total Income

Costs & Spending

57.1%

€303,325
Personnel

15.2%

€80,556
Travel & Subsistence

0.45%

€2,390
Equipment & Depreciation

3.8%

€ 20,033
Rental

17.3%

€ 91,680

External Assistance / Subcontracting

6.3%

€33,432

Other Direct Costs

100%

€531,416

Total Expenditure

Our Funders

Zero Waste Europe gratefully acknowledges funding support for the following institutions in 2015. Thank you! Without the support of our donors Zero Waste Europe’s work would not be possible. We would like to thank & acknowledge the following institutions and foundations which have helped to fund our work:

  • EU Commission Directorate General Environment
  • Adessium
  • Global Green Grants Fund
  • Education, Audiovisual & Culture Executive Agency
  • Patagonia
  • XminusY
  • GAIA (Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives)

Governance

Zero Waste Europe’s Board are elected at the Annual General Meeting and are not paid for their roles, only having necessary expenses covered.

Rossano is a primary school teacher, and passionate Zero Waste leader. He has more than 20 years experience in the waste field and is a leading name of the zero waste movement in Italy. As a result of his efforts his home-town Capannori was the first European city to declare the goal of zero waste by 2020. He has helped the Zero Waste movement grow beyond the Italian borders into what is now the Zero Waste Europe movement. In 2013 Rossano was awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize, considered the “Green Nobel Prize” for his contributions to the Zero Waste movement in Italy.

Rossano is a primary school teacher, and passionate Zero Waste leader. He has more than 20 years experience in the waste field and is a leading name of the zero waste movement in Italy. As a result of his efforts his home-town Capannori was the first European city to declare the goal of zero waste by 2020. He has helped the Zero Waste movement grow beyond the Italian borders into what is now the Zero Waste Europe movement. In 2013 Rossano was awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize, considered the “Green Nobel Prize” for his contributions to the Zero Waste movement in Italy.

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Flore Berlingen, Secretary of the Board and Director of Zero Waste France speaking in Paris at the COP21

Flore Berlingen was elected as Secretary of the Board at the Ljubljana AGM in 2016, and is the Director of Zero Waste France and the Co-Founder of OuiShare.

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Huub

Huub Scheele is Treasurer of the Board and works for Both Ends in the Netherlands. He has experience in environmental science and pollution and has worked extensively in Eastern Europe. He also has experience working in Latin America and has been involved in numerous environmental organisations.

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Elena Rastei is a Member of the Board

Victor Mitjans is the research coordinator for the Fundació Prevenció de Residus i Consum and a member of CEPA (Centre D’Ecologia i Projectes Alternatius). He is a member of the Zero Waste Europe Board, and provides expert knowledge on zero waste issues.

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Our Staff

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JV
Pawel Gluszynski
Delphine
Stanislas

Our Network

Zero Waste Europe’s Network as of 2016

The United Kingdom Without Incineration Network (UKWIN) was central to the coordinated efforts that in 2015 brought repeated successes in derailing numerous gasification proposals associated with Clean Power Properties.

We believe that we managed to delay at least 9 of these projects beyond their subsidy cut-off date. This was achieved through actions taken in conjunction with member groups and directly as UKWIN, e.g. UKWIN evidence submitted to inform local planning decisions, national planning inquiries, and environmental permitting consultations.

In 2015 UKWIN also held a successful Campaign Strategy Workshop that brought anti-incineration, anti-biomass and pro-zero-waste campaigners together to compare notes and to engage in strategic discussions regarding how to build our Zero Waste movement in the UK.

The Hungarian Network of Zero Waste Towns was been launched with 10 municipalities already signed by the end of 2015.

Between 2-4th November the first international Zero Waste Conference was organized in Budapest. During the three days more than 200 people participated from various fields: municipalities, businesses, kindergartens, schools, universities and NGOs.

We have coordinated the national network of Green Kindergartens and Ecoschools and thanks to our work and the work of our member organisations, hundreds of teachers had been mentored and trained and many kindergartens and schools had won the ‘Green’ title.

A competition was started for citizens to redesign old stuff into something new. From the best works we made an exhibition that toured around Hungary. It was a great success and this year we will be able to continue it.

European Environment Commissioner Karmenu Vella made a statement at the Italian Parliament that some of our zero waste communities (including Treviso and Capannori) are the best examples of “Circular Economy made real”

Our Paper on Landfill Bans (making the case against them) proved that Zero Waste schemes are minimising disposal much more than incineration-based schemes.